Category Archives: Turbo Care

Caring for your turbo to help it last as long as possible. Help prevent premature turbo failures.

PTE Garrett T3 T4 TO4E TO4B Turbo Rebuild Kit

 

T3 T4 TO4B TO4S 360 Degree Turbo Rebuild kitHere is The Most Common Turbo Rebuild Kit for Garrett, Comp, PTE, and Turbonetics Turbochargers. This a Garrett T3 T4 TO4E TO4B Turbo Rebuild Kit This Kit is Easily Identified By Measuring the Turbine Shaft Bore. If you have a 6.35mm Shaft Bore Where the Compressor wheel Sits then This is the Correct Kit that You need.

Standard Shaft Bore: 6.35mm, When you Measure your Shaft You Will get Around 6.2mm, This Means That This is the Kit for Your Turbo.

If Your Turbine Shaft Measures 7.93mm Where the Compressor Wheel sits Then Your Turbo Uses a Big Shaft Rebuild Kit Which We Sell Here!

Keep In Mind that it is very Common That Your turbo May have a 270 Degree Thrust Bearing, Don’t Be Alarmed, Because Our 360 Degree Rebuild Kit Drops Directly in Its place. Here is a Comparison Between The 270 and 360 Degree Thrust Bearings: 270 vs 360 Degree Thrust Bearing

 

 

 

 

Here Are the Details About This Rebuild Kit: 

This is an 360 Degree Upgraded Garrett Turbo Rebuild Kit for a 6.35mm shaft bore TO4E, TO4B, TO4S, TO4R, TO4Z turbo. This Kit Comes with The Compressor Plates for the TO4S TO4B TO4R TO4Z Turbos. (If you need the T04E compressor Plates, Please look for Our Other Listing “Garrett TO4E Turbo Rebuild Kit”)

Details kit includes:

  • 6.35mm shaft/compressor bore
  • Upgraded 360 degree Thrust Bearing With Larger Thrust Spacer and Collar
  • Works in 6.35mm Shaft Bore / Compressor Wheel Bore   Turbonetics, Precision, Garrett Turbos
  • Dual oil port thrust bearing
  • Works with TO4S, TO4E, TO4B, TO4Z, TO4R 6.35mm shaft bore turbos
  • Brass Thrust Bearing Prevents Common PTE’s Steel Thrust Bearing Failures

This rebuild kit works with 6.35mm shaft /compressor bore garrett, precision, and turbonetics turbos. The brass thrust bearing help dispate heat better than the earlier factory steel thrust bearing design.

The kit includes:

  • 6 compressor housing bolts
  • 6 exhaust housing bolts
  • 4 Compressor Plate to Bearing Housing Bolts
  • Compressor Housing Brackets
  • Exhaust Housing Brackets
  • 4 Bearing C-Clips
  • 1 360 Thrust Bearing,
  • 1 Thrust Collar
  • 1 Flinger
  • Front and Rear piston rings,
  • Compressor Housing O-ring Seal
  • Bearing Housing to Compressor Plate O-ring Seal
  • 3 Thrust Bearing Bolts
  • 1 Compressor Nut

Works with Precision (all 6.35mm shaft bore pte turbos)

  • 4854B
  • 4831B
  • 5454E
  • Pte 5431E
  • Pte 6051E
  • 5554E
  • 5531E
  • 5831E
  • 5931E
  • 6176E
  • 6776E
  • 6266
  • 6466

If You Need To Purchase This Rebuild Kit, You can buy it Here:

 

Garret t3 t4 turbo rebuild kit

 

**And More! If your Not Sure Measure Your Shaft Bore, If your Still Not Sure Then Ask Us.

If You See That You Turbo Does Not Have Threads to Bolt Down The Thrust Bearing, Do Not worry, This Thrust  Bearing has Holes for the Dowel Pins on the Bearing Housing. If Your turbo Doesn’t Use Screws To Hold the Thrust Bearing Down, It likely Uses This Retaining Ring In the Compressor Plate.  Keep In Mind The Newest PTE Turbos Have the Compressor Plate Designed To Retain the Thrust Bearing Rather than This Ring.to4e to4b thrust bearing retaining ring

 

 

 

 

 

Though It is Rare Some PTE Turbos Have Unique Turbine Shaft Which Use Unique Bearings Like In the Picture Below However, We Do Offer a Solution To This Unique Kit. If You Need These Journal Bearings, Email Us at Turbolabamerica@gmail.com So we can setup a Listing for you. Here are Pictures Of the Unique But Rare PTE Parts:

pte weird journal bearing

PTE Unique Journal Bearing

PTE 5031 Turbine shaft

 

 

 

 

The Bearings Must go with the Turbine Shaft. However if you Wanted to You could Replace the shaft with a Normal Shaft and Use the Original Garrett Journal Bearings.

TDO4, TDO4H, TDO4L, TDO4HL, Turbo Rebuild kit

This is an upgrade turbo rebuild kit for Volvo, Hyundai, saab, MHI rallyart, 89-94 auto DSM, Subaru WRX.

Buy TDO4 Turbo Rebuild Kit. (TDO4, TDO4H, TDO4L, TDO4HL)

Click Link To Purchase TDO4 Turbo Rebuild Kit:

TDO4 Turbo Rebuild Kit

Learn Why You Need This Turbo Rebuild Kit if You are Rebuilding a TDO4 Turbo. This Kit is Critical to Have if you are Planning on Running Higher Boost on Your TDO4 Turbocharger! If you like our work, feel free to join our facebook page and group. If you need Parts for Your Turbo Build we also Sell Everything to Build New Turbo Chargers. We Also Sell KTS billet wheels.Community: www.facebook.com/groups/turbolab/

Business page: www.facebook.com/turbolabamerica

Shopping: www.turbolabofamerica.com

Contact: turbolabamerica@gmail.com

Key words:
MHI TDO4 turbo rebuild kit
TDO4 Turbo Rebuild Kit
TDO4HL Turbo Rebuild Kit
TDO4H Turbo Rebuild
TDO4L Turbo Rebuild
13T Turbo Upgrade
15t Turbo Upgrade
14t Turbo Upgrade
16t Turbo Upgrade
15g Turbo Upgrade
13g Turbo Upgrade
19t Turbo Upgrade
20T Turbo Upgrade
50mm TDO4 Turbo Upgrade
TDO4 Turbo Upgrade
TDO4HL Turbo Upgrade
TDO4 SuperBack Turbo Upgrade

Common Vehicles That Use This Rebuild Kit

88-94 DSM (Automatic transmission) Eclipse,Talon, Plymouth laser turbo rebuild kit
Hyundai Genensis TDO4 Turbo
Sabb TDO4 Turbo
Volvo TDO4, TDO4HL Turbo Upgrade
Acura RDX Turbo Upgrade
3000 GT Turbo Rebuild Kit
Subaru 13T TDO4L WRX Turbo
Dodge Stealth Turbo Rebuild Kit
EVO X Lancer Ralliart 15T

NOTE: Thrust bearing Not for TDO4LR (srt4) Reverse

If You Need Help Rebuilding Your Turbo Please Watch Our Videos on How to Rebuild You Specific Turbocharger!  If you Would Like Our Services, Please Contact Us Here.

Understanding I Why Turbine housings Crack

Turbine housings can crack from an improper tune which causes high EGT (exhaust temperatures). Another reason why they crack is due to improper cool down of the turbocharger. It is important to let the automobile idle for a few minutes to let the oil recirculate through the turbo charger to remove the heat from the turbo charger. This cool down period is even more important in the winter time. During this idle time exhaust system will also release heat. Turbine housings cracking is not covered by OEM manufactures due to falling under the category of miss use of the turbocharger.  This is also something that is out of our control.

Most manufactures use a nickel additive in the turbine housings, the help prevent cracking of the turbine housing. This significantly reduces the chance of the turbine housing cracking. However Often the turbine housing will still crack on sharp edges in the turbine housing.

Some companies have also used pure stainless steel turbine housings, which also reduces the possibility of the turbine housing cracking. However, sharp edges of the turbine housing still tend to crack. A way to try and prevent cracking is to use a porting tool and sand the sharp edges of the turbine housing smooth, which I do to the best of my ability. However I have no control over improper cool down of the turbocharger.

What to do to Help your Turbo Last Longer

Turbo Failure

       To get the most life out of your turbocharger it is very important to understand how turbochargers fail. The most common reason for failure is the seals leaking in the turbocharger because of wear.  Shutting your engine off immediately after hauling heavy loads in your truck or doing hard pulls in your car, causes the oil on the turbine to dry up. The next time your start the vehicle the turbocharger will experience a dry start and this is what causes the wear.  If you allow your engine to idle after putting your vehicle under extreme loads, the engine oil will circulate and take away the heat in the engine and turbo charger. The recommended idle time is 1 to 5 minutes depending on how hard you push your car or trucTo get the most life out of your turbocharger it is very important to understand how turbochargers fail. The most common reason for failure is the seals leaking in the turbocharger because of wear.  Shutting your engine off immediately after hauling heavy loads in your truck or doing hard pulls in your car, causes the oil on the turbine to dry up. The next time your start the vehicle the turbocharger will experience a dry start and this is what causes the wear.  If you allow your engine to idle after putting your vehicle under extreme loads, the engine oil will circulate and take away the heat in the engine and turbo charger. The recommended idle time is 1 to 5 minutes depending on how hard you push your car or truck.

Lack of Lubrication

        The next common  cause of failure of your turbo is running to thin of oil. The thicker the oil the better the protection in higher heat conditions. The thinner oil is for extreme cold conditions. The oil weight for your engine is just as important for your turbo, and you should go by what the manufacture recommends. For race car applications, its important to go with racing oil.  I have one customer that lives in the  below  0°F temperature, and he would put 5w 30 motor oil in it in the winter, which is fine for those temperatures, but when summer came around every year, his turbo would fail.  The manufacture of his turbo recommends 10w 30 year round.

How does oil contamination damage turbos?

       Oil contamination is another common cause of failure of turbochargers. Oil contamination can be carbon, sludge, metal flake, or dirt which gets in the turbocharger and clogs up the thrust bearing and causes in and out play, or locks up a bearing and shaft and causes the shaft to break. The most common problem of oil contamination is metal flake and carbon clogging up the thrust bearing of a turbo. I have also seen parts of stripped threads inside a thrust bearing.  To help prevent oil contamination you can run the oil pressure from the oil filter housing directly to the turbocharger. Most contaminates in the oil are found in the cylinder head, by taking oil straight from the oil filter you are taking the cleanest oil available and bypassing the cylinder head.  When a turbo blows oil it puts your engine and its components at high risk for failure, because the oil pressure become lower.  Also when the oil level gets to so low that the oil pressure becomes non-existant.     

As turbochargers can operate at over 240,000 rpm and temperatures of 950°C, turbo bearings are under great stress. The turbine shaft and bearings rotate in a thin film of oil. Consequently any fault with the oil supply to the turbo means its bearings are likely to fail before the engine’s main bearings. Running a turbo without oil for five seconds is more harmful as a motor running without oil for five minutes. Since the turbo spins over 39 times faster than an engine, you will see a turbo fail 39 times soon than the engine. When a turbo blows oil it puts your engine and its components at high risk for failure, because the oil pressure become lower.  Also when the oil level gets to so low that the oil pressure becomes non-existant.  When a turbo is leaking oil, it also is causing a drop in oil pressure to the rest of the engine. This concept can be compared to a water hose being sprayed, if you poke a hole in the hose, the water will still be sprayed out of the hose but the pressure is much lower.

.      While it is important to check the engine oil pressure meets the manufacturer’s specifications, it is even more critical that the oil feed lines to the turbo are clean and clear, so you are certain they can supply uncontaminated oil, at the correct pressure. Contaminated or dirty oil will scratch or score the bearings, leading to rapid wear and ultimately, turbocharger failure.  95% of turbo failures are because of problems with oil starvation, oil contamination or foreign object damage.

 

 What causes contaminated oil?

       A blocked, damaged oil filter, carbon build-up in the engine, engine parts transfer over from a blown engine, and accidental contamination of new oil during servicing.such as a cylinder head are all often causes of repeated oil contamination causing even new turbo chargers to blow oil immediately after install. This can rapidly contaminate even new oil.  On some vehicles, the oil bypasses the oil filter above 4500 rpm to provide better oil flow to the engine. Another type of oil contamination is gasoline or coolant. Having gasoline in the oil is often caused from worn spark plugs not burning the fuel off or from acids that build up in the oil from use causing premature wear from not changing the oil on time.  Coolant in your engine oil is just as damaging as pouring water in your engine oil and expecting the water to lubricate the engine parts. The coolant in the engine can cause the engine or turbo charger to hydro-lock.

Preventing turbo failure

• Always use fresh oil, the correct oil weight, and new oil filters as recommended by the engine manufacturer when installing a new turbo. We do not recommend using an inline filter in the oil feed line of the turbo charger because it can clog and cause problems, the best way is to run your oil feed line straight a location where oil has just pass through the oil filter. Often if there is something wrong with the motor’s oil pressure, regardless if the turbo that you install is good, it will blow oil.  Clean or replace oil feed and return lines to eliminate any carbon deposits or sludge that can enter the turbo or restrict the oil flow to the bearings. Before installing a new turbo, find out what caused the first turbo to fail or you risk the replacement turbo failing too.

       Turbo Lab supplies remanufactured replacement turbochargers, made by the original manufacturers to the highest quality standards. Though we confidently guarantee them, our standard warranty does not cover turbocharger failure caused by oil contamination or lack of oil.

 

 

 

Boost Control Explained

 

 

       internalwg2Boost creep– Boost creep is caused when a free flowing exhaust system is put on a turbo charged car. When revving out to higher rpms your boost pressure(psi) will rise as your rpms of the motor rise. This happens because the waste gate passage can not flow enough air to by pass the turbo to control the boost efficiently. The reason why this happens when you change out the exhaust to a free flowing exhaust is because you the smaller exhaust provided back pressure which caused resistance to flow air passed the turbine wheel.

 

External WG

How to fix this: You can port the waste gate flapper area and add a bigger flapper valve to help prevent boost creep, but the best way is to go external waste gate and select the appropriate waste gate spring for the boost level that you plan to run. We find that it works best that the wastegate spring base pressure should be half or more than the boost pressure that you plan to run. So if you are running 30 psi, then you should have a 15 psi wastegate actuator.  The problems with porting the flapper hole and adding a bigger flapper is that it makes it harder to run higher boost levels. Dsm guys will see that there boost level will spike to their set boost level (lets say 20 psi), then when their rpms increase the flapper valve will have a hard time closing, because of the increased surface area of the bigger flapper valve in combination with the waste gate base spring pressure being to low, which makes the flapper struggle to shut to control the massive amount of air pressure that is coming through the turbine housing. When the valve is having a hard time closing it is releasing more pressure out of the turbine housing than it is supposed to their for even though your boost level is set to 20 psi it will fall off to 16 psi and hold a lower boost level to redline. The best way to go is to go external waste gate.